Scripta

What is Integrative Massage Therapy?

Posted by on Jun 20, 2017 in Scripta | 0 comments

Our recent hire Amir Salkic has completed the 5 year program at the Canadian College of Osteopathy and is a D.O.M.P. candidate. Amir integrates his skills and knowledge to better serve your therapeutic needs by providing you with safer and more effective treatments.

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Fathers Day BBQ Chicken Wings with Blue Cheese Butter

Posted by on Jun 18, 2017 in Scripta | 0 comments

What better way to celebrate Dad than with a BBQ? These chicken wings with blue cheese butter are sure to be a big hit!

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Four Reasons Why You Should Try Foam Rolling

Posted by on Jun 16, 2017 in Scripta | 0 comments

For those not familiar, foam rolling is almost like a massage that you perform on yourself using the foam roller as an assistive tool for self-myofascial release. The goal is to target the body’s fascia, or the connective tissue encasing our muscles. Here are reasons why you should incorporate foam rolling into your routine:

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Bloordale Adopt-a-Street-Tree Project

Posted by on Jun 9, 2017 in Community, Scripta | 0 comments

We’re very happy to be a supporter of the Bloordale Adopt-a-Street-Tree project! We have a beautiful Freeman Maple Tree in front of our clinic which we take care of as part of the project. This Saturday (June 10th) at 2pm there is a walking tour of interesting trees in the neighbourhood, for people to learn more about different tree species in the community and learn a bit more about how we can help care for our trees! Here is their Facebook event page to learn more!    

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Massage proven to reduce inflammation

Posted by on Jun 5, 2017 in Scripta | 0 comments

Studies out of McMaster University have proven that post-sports massage to reduce inflammation and promote healing as anti-inflamatory medications do, and boost your ability to recover from exercise. Read more here!

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Acupuncture FAQ, Part One

Posted by on Jun 2, 2017 in Scripta | 1 comment

We sat down with our Acupuncturist, Annette Lambert, R.Ac, to ask her a couple questions about what people can expect from an acupuncture treatment. This is the part of a series which answers questions we have been asked regarding acupuncture treatment. If I don’t want to have any needles, can I still get a treatment? Absolutely!  With your consent, your acupuncturist can choose to do acupressure using her fingers and thumbs or can apply magnetic pellets (“seeds”) to stimulate acupuncture points.  In fact, you can also ask your acupuncturist to perform TuiNa, an ancient form of Traditional Chinese massage, Cupping, or Gua Sha. What are Cupping and Gua Sha and what do they do? Cupping utilizes suction to break up connective tissue adhesions and scar tissue, it promotes  tissue perfusion, reduces inflammation, decreases tension and stiffness, and thus helps promote local circulation, relieve  sore, muscles and spasms, and facilitates the healing process.  From both a Western Medical and a Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective, cupping promotes circulation and breaks up stagnation (of Qi and Blood) and promotes relaxation.  The Flash Cupping method is also useful in the loosening of chest congestion and phlegm for removal from the body.  This loosening of chest congestion is thus immensely helpful for treating asthma, bronchitis, chest colds and flus and for bringing some relief for emphysema.  Cupping can also be applied to the abdomen to promote bowel movements and assist with digestion. Cupping has become more popular in the West and its popularity has risen with its distinct circular marks.  These distinct marks have been seen on the likes of Olympic Gold Medalist swimmer Michael Phelps, Rio Olympic gymnast Alex Naddour to help them with their sore challenged muscles allowing them to recover faster and be at the ready to compete.  The marks have also graced the backs and torsos of celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow, Jennifer Aniston, and Justin Beiber, as well as on the arms of our Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau. Cupping has been utilized for thousands of years in the Middle East, East Asia, and Ancient Egypt.  Traditionally, cupping involved the use of a flame inserted quickly into a glass, bamboo, ceramic, or animal horn cup to remove the oxygen and create a vacuum.  Modern cupping can also be achieved with plastic cups and a hand pump or with flexible silicone cups. When applied speedily to the skin, the underlying tissue layers are drawn up into the cup which results in enlargement of the tiny blood vessels; this enlargement promotes the flow of fresh blood  and lymph into the area.  However, this enlargement of the capillaries (tiny blood vessels) can also lead to some extraversion (leakage) which is visible as redness and bruising.  Depending on your body, the quickness with which it heals, and how deeply seated the stagnation is, the redness, bruising and/or suction marks (that look like you have been hugged by an octopus) can disappear by the end of the treatment or last up to ten days.  On average, most cupping marks and bruising will disappear in 3-4 days.  The only other side effect is mild to moderate temporary temporary discomfort as stagnation is dissipated and the underlying tissues opened up.  ...

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